Sports Cards

Sports Cards Returns vs S&P

0.10%

Versus S&P

-16.60%

44 minutes ago

0.10%

Versus S&P

-16.60%

44 minutes ago

6m High

6m Low

circle

Sports Cards

709.35

702.61

circle

S&P 500

4,525.12

3,585.62

circle

Sports Cards

circle

S&P 500

icon
Does not follow the Stock Market

Sources: PWCC 2500, SPX

In the Market

Check out Sports Cards in the stock market

Highlights

Time Horizon

7-10 years

Buying and selling sports cards has historically taken two forms: an expensive investment class for wealthy enthusiasts and a hobby for sports fans. Recently, the blue-chip cards that wealthy enthusiasts purchase have become more accessible to everyday investors via fractional marketplaces like Otis, Collectable and Rally. While these markets offer access to top-notch assets with the potential for double-digit returns, liquidity is difficult, and as such, sports cards investors should expect to hold their position for many years

Did you Know

  • poitStar

    An autographed Lebron James rookie card sold for a then record-setting $5.2 million in April 2021. In July 2020—not even a year earlier—that same card sold for a mere $1.6 million.

  • poitStar

    Industry analyst David Yoken estimates the value of the sports card investing business at $5.4 billion on the low end.

  • poitStar

    Notable sports card investors include rapper Quavo, Snoop Dogg, and DJ Steve Aoki, who founded and owns a brick-and-mortar sports card retail operation called Cards and Coffee.

Consideration

    Reasons to Invest

  • Capture a piece of a growing market — the sports card industry is worth billions and is projected to grow throughout the 2020s with multiple companies going public within the next year

  • Investing in sports cards adds a tangible asset to your portfolio with financial and emotional upside

  • Returns for blue chip sports cards (PWCC 500) have beaten the S&P over the past decade

    Drawbacks

  • While sports nerds might be able to predict a winning card here and there, investments in sports cards are largely speculative. You never know if a given card will appreciate in value over time.

  • If you buy physical sports cards, you'll need a solid storage method, which can involve extra costs. The condition of a card is integral to its value.

  • This is a very illiquid investment, meaning you can't convert it to cash quickly and easily. You'll need to find a buyer who's willing to pay what the card is worth, and that can take time.

How You’re Taxed

Become a Member

for Free to Unlock Access

How You’re Taxed

Capital Gains

Capital Gains

Income Tax

Income Tax

If you are investing on a sports card investment platform like Collectable, where you own a fraction of or a % of a card:

  1. Sale of card: If the card is sold, you receive the equivalent of a dividend. Your profits are then taxed as income.
  2. Secondary market: If you trade your shares on the secondary market, your profits are taxed as capital gains.

For those of you selling a sports card you purchased, card investments are classified as 'collectibles.' Gains on cards held for one year or less are taxed as ordinary income—the same tax treatment as short-term capital gains (STCGs). Gains on cards held more than one year are taxed as ordinary income, except the maximum tax rate is 28%

Explore Assets

Tether
Farmland
Wine
Art
Real Estate
Robo Advisor
Gold
Bitcoin
Stocks
Lending
Startups
Ethereum
DeFi
Solana
Oil & Commodities
Polkadot
Metaverse
NFTs
Whiskey
Bonds
Platinum
Sports Cards
Dogecoin
Cardano
Ripple
Silver
Music Royalties
Watches